Our Mission

Haysville Community Library
It is the mission of the Haysville Community Library, a tax-supported community resource, to provide informational, educational and recreational services, materials and programs to users of all ages.



Catalog Books for sale at the Haysville Community Library
A Hole in my World by Ernest Miller

A Hole in my World: Coming of Age in Kansas by Ernest Miller. There is both joy and sorrow in this story of growing up in Kansas under the shadows of schizophrenia, the Great Depression, and World War II. Ernie Miller's boyhood finds the back gate leading to the farm while the front gate opens upon small town adventures. His adolescence was experienced in a boys' detention home, followed by a tour of duty in the United States Navy during the time of the Korean War. Then came service in the YMCA, a college pursuit, and the beginning of a career in education. Proceeds from the book go to Ernie Miller.


In Days Gone By Haysville, Kansas 1870-1920

"In Days Gone By" Haysville, Kansas 1870-1920" edited by Judy Pegg and Ruth Clark. When the City of Haysville entered into the agreement with the State Preservation Officer to do a survey of the original town and surrounding streets, we had no idea of the flood of historical information to be generated. Proceeds from the book go to Haysville Community Library Foundation.


History of the Haysville Public Schools 1876-2006

History of the Haysville Public Schools 1876-2006 by Wayne Holt. "As a member of the professional staff of the Haysville Public Schools from 1957-1997 and a member of the Board of Education from 1999-2005, I have witnessed much of the history of the district." Proceeds from the book go to Haysville Community Library Foundation.


The Descendants of Nicholas Cain 1736-1986

"The Descendants of Nicolas Cain" 1736-1986 by Wayne R. Cain and Shirley J. Evans. "Sometime in the middle 1960's, and having reached the half century mark, I decided that it was time to dispose of a portion of my business and think about slowing down. However, having led a busy and interesting life, I found that it was not as easy as it sounds. Therefore, one day during an idle examination of a family tree book of my wife's family, I became curious enough about my own lineage to question my mother concerning her knowledge of the Cain history." Proceeds from the book go to the Haysville Community Library Genealogy Department.


Are you a concerned citizen of Haysville who wishes to contribute your time and talents to benefit the community? Would you enjoy being more involved in the good governance of the Haysville Community Library, creating a lasting legacy for all the residents of our city? If this describes you, consider serving on the Haysville Community Library Board. For more information, contact Library Director Betty Cattrell at 316-524-5242.

Storytime, Tuesdays at 10:30 am

Library News & Upcoming Events

Fall Book Discussions

The Exile's Place

The exile's place is a site of construction: old ideas, foodways, religious beliefs, language, and habits are used to build a new life in a place newly settled. This place is always also a site of contest, of struggle to establish a new way of being with residents already there who might reject the newcomer because of his or her religion or skin color or anything else that differs from the new land's norm. What drives the exile to this new place - whether the quest for new opportunity or the flight from oppression or war - colors both the memories of the land left behind and the perspectives on the new homeland. The exile straddles frontiers; finding a balance is always a question, always a negotiation.

None of this is new: the experience of exile is deeply rooted in human history, as the causes (war, famine, ostracism, unequal opportunites) can be traced back as far as humanity's first efforts to establish place. The literature of the ages tells us as much. But the scale of migrations has massively increased over the course of the past century. Think of the waves of immigrants prompted by revolutions in Cuba, or genocides in Sudan, or the closing of the Iron Curtain. Think of immigrants seeking job opportunities around the world in recent decades: South Asians and West Indians in postwar Britian, Africans and Middle Easterners in contemporary Europe, Phillipinos everywhere.

For America, this nation of immigrants, none of this is unfamiliar territory. From the Puritan pilgrims forward, American history can be written in terms of sequential waves of immigrations. In American's Chinatowns and Little Italys and barrios, in all its assorted ethnic enclaves, the terms of the exile's place are continuously negotiated. None of which means we gave quite figured it all out, as contemporary disputes show. The Exile's Place highlights the complex negotiations and contested territories of the exile, seeking that elusive balance between the homeland lost and the homeland won.


The Lazarus Project by Aleksandar Hemon

The Lazarus Project by Aleksandar Hemon was the first book in the discussion series entitled The Exile's Place. The discussion took place on Monday October 13th at 7:00 PM. The discussion leader was Denise Low, retired humanities professor and former poet laureate of Kansas.

Bosnian Vladimir Brik, like Hemon himself, is caught in exile in Chicago by the wars that broke up Yugoslavia. Obsessed with Lazarus Averbach, an immigrant who had fled Moldavian pogroms in the early twentieth century only to be gunned down by Chicago police as a presumed anarchist, Brik returns to Eastern Europe to explore the roots of the earlier tragedy. The parrellels illuminate the recurrent motifs of exile and the sufferings of Central Europeans through the bloody history of the twentieth century.


The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri

The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri was the second book in the discussion series entitled The Exile's Place. The discussion took place on Monday October 27th at 7:00 PM. The discussion leader was Anne Bimey, independant scholar and partner in Ride Into History.

This story of the Indian-American Ganguli family centers on Gogol, the eldest son named after the famous Russian writer. The novel highlights the different ways in which Gogol's parents, first-generation immigrants, and Gogol and his generation, American-born children of immigrants, interact with India as a place, a culture, and an ethnic identity, and how they work to shape these identities within the New World.


Things I've Been Silent About by Azar Nafisi

Things I've Been Silent About by Azar Nafisi was the third book in the discussion series entitled The Exile's Place. The discussion took place on Monday November 10th at 7:00 PM. The discussion leader was Tom Prasch, Chair of History Department at Washburn University.

Iranian exile Azar Nafisi recognizes that "the ease with which all that you call home, all that gives you an identity, a sense of self and belonging, can be taken away from you." Her memoir covers both her increasing alienation from the theocratic state in Iran and her complex relationships with her mother, whose "coffee hours" with other women offered a refuge from an increasingly controlled public sphere, and her father, who kept his own secret diary.


Brick Lane by Monica Ali

Brick Lane by Monica Ali is the fourth and final book in the discussion series entitled The Exile's Place. The discussion will be held on Monday November 24th at 7:00 PM. The discussion leader will be Nancy Hope from the Center for East Asian Studies at Kansas University.

Nazneen is an eighteen year old Bangladeshi brought to Britian in an arranged marriage with almost no preparation - the only words she knows in English are "sorry" and "thank you." She must make a life with her much older, comically incompetent husband and survive her impoverished and violent surroundings in the Brick Lane territory of East London that has been the refuge for waves of immigrants from the eighteenth century onward.

Refreshments will be provided at each book discussion.

        • Due to the Thanksgiving holiday the Library Board Meeting will be held on Tuesday November 25th, at 7:00 PM in the community room of the library.
        • The library will be closed on Thursday November 27th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. The library will be open during normal hours on Friday November 28th from 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM.
          Closed for Thanksgiving!
        • The next will be on Saturday November 29th starting at 10:30 AM. Everyone is welcome to come in to play some board games with the staff as well as other people who like board games.

          Some of the games we play

          Meeple Mayhem
          • Smash Up
          • Lords of Waterdeep
          • Pandemic
          • Ticket to Ride
          • Forbidden Desert
          • Munchkin
          • And many more...
        • The Next Monday Evening Movie will be on Monday December 1st at 6:00 PM in the community room. The movie being shown is Holiday Inn.
          Monday Evening Movie
        • There will be a planning meeting for the 4th Annual Mid-Kansas Living History Rendezvous on Monday December 8th at 5:30 PM. The planning meeting are open to the public and anyone interested in being involved with the Rendezvous.
          4th Annual Mid-Kansas Living History Rendezvous Planning Meeting
        • The next Monday Evening Movie will be shown on Monday December 8th at 6:00 PM in the community room. The movie being shown is The Maltese Falcon.
          Monday Evening Movie
        • The next meeting of the Genealogy Group will be on Saturday December 13th, and will be held on the lower level at 2:00 PM. You can also find the Genealogy Group on facebook. Just look for GENEALOGY at the Haysville Community Library.
          Genealogy Meeting Saturday June 14th
        • The Next Monday Evening Movie will be on Monday December 15th at 6:00 PM in the community room. The movie being shown is The Muppet Christmas Carol.
          Monday Evening Movie